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SEC Filing Details

10-K
NRG ENERGY, INC. filed this Form 10-K on 03/01/2018
Entire Document
 

Counterparty Credit Risk
As of December 31, 2017, counterparty credit exposure, excluding credit exposure from RTOs, ISOs, and registered commodity exchanges and certain long-term agreements, was $220 million and NRG held collateral (cash and letters of credit) against those positions of $30 million, resulting in a net exposure of $196 million. Approximately 73% of the Company's exposure before collateral is expected to roll off by the end of 2019. Counterparty credit exposure is valued through observable market quotes and discounted at a risk free interest rate. The following tables highlight net counterparty credit exposure by industry sector and by counterparty credit quality. Net counterparty credit exposure is defined as the aggregate net asset position for NRG with counterparties where netting is permitted under the enabling agreement and includes all cash flow, mark-to-market and NPNS, and non-derivative transactions. The exposure is shown net of collateral held, and includes amounts net of receivables or payables.
Category
Net Exposure (a) (b)
(% of Total)
Financial institutions
14
%
Utilities, energy merchants, marketers and other
86

Total
100
%
Category
Net Exposure (a) (b)
(% of Total)
Investment grade
69
%
Non-Investment grade/Non-Rated
31

Total
100
%
(a)
Counterparty credit exposure excludes uranium and coal transportation contracts because of the unavailability of market prices.
(b)
The figures in the tables above exclude potential counterparty credit exposure related to RTOs, ISOs, registered commodity exchanges and certain long term contracts.
NRG has counterparty credit risk exposure to certain counterparties, each of which represent more than 10% of total net exposure discussed above. The aggregate of such counterparties' exposure was $37 million as of December 31, 2017. Changes in hedge positions and market prices will affect credit exposure and counterparty concentration. Given the credit quality, diversification and term of the exposure in the portfolio, NRG does not anticipate a material impact on the Company's financial position or results of operations from nonperformance by any of NRG's counterparties.
RTOs and ISOs
The Company participates in the organized markets of CAISO, ERCOT, ISO-NE, MISO, NYISO and PJM, known as RTOs or ISOs. Trading in these markets is approved by FERC, or in the case of ERCOT, approved by the PUCT and includes credit policies that, under certain circumstances, require that losses arising from the default of one member on spot market transactions be shared by the remaining participants. As a result, the counterparty credit risk to these markets is limited to NRG’s share of overall market and are excluded from the above exposures.
Exchange Traded Transactions
The Company enters into commodity transactions on registered exchanges, notably ICE and NYMEX. These clearinghouses act as the counterparty and transactions are subject to extensive collateral and margining requirements. As a result, these commodity transactions have limited counterparty credit risk.
Long Term Contracts
Counterparty credit exposure described above excludes credit risk exposure under certain long term agreements, including California tolling agreements, Gulf Coast load obligations, wind and solar PPAs. As external sources or observable market quotes are not available to estimate such exposure, the Company values these contracts based on various techniques including, but not limited to, internal models based on a fundamental analysis of the market and extrapolation of observable market data with similar characteristics. Based on these valuation techniques, as of December 31, 2017, aggregate credit risk exposure managed by NRG to these counterparties was approximately $4.1 billion, including $2.6 billion related to assets of NRG Yield, Inc., for the next five years. This amount excludes potential credit exposures for projects with long term PPAs that have not reached commercial operations. The majority of these power contracts are with utilities or public power entities with strong credit quality and public utility commission or other regulatory support. However, such regulated utility counterparties can be impacted by changes in government regulations, which NRG is unable to predict.

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