SEC Filings

10-K
NRG ENERGY, INC. filed this Form 10-K on 02/29/2016
Entire Document
 
                

Fair Value of Derivative Instruments
NRG may enter into power purchase and sales contracts, fuel purchase contracts and other energy-related financial instruments to mitigate variability in earnings due to fluctuations in spot market prices and to hedge fuel requirements at generation facilities or retail load obligations. In addition, in order to mitigate interest rate risk associated with the issuance of the Company's variable rate and fixed rate debt, NRG enters into interest rate swap agreements.
NRG's trading activities are subject to limits in accordance with the Company's Risk Management Policy. These contracts are recognized on the balance sheet at fair value and changes in the fair value of these derivative financial instruments are recognized in earnings.
The tables below disclose the activities that include both exchange and non-exchange traded contracts accounted for at fair value in accordance with ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, or ASC 820. Specifically, these tables disaggregate realized and unrealized changes in fair value; disaggregate estimated fair values at December 31, 2015, based on their level within the fair value hierarchy defined in ASC 820; and indicate the maturities of contracts at December 31, 2015. For a full discussion of the Company's valuation methodology of its contracts, see Derivative Fair Value Measurements in Item 15 — Note 4, Fair Value of Financial Instruments, to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Derivative Activity Gains/(Losses)
(In millions)
Fair value of contracts as of December 31, 2014
$
413

Contracts realized or otherwise settled during the period
(363
)
Changes in fair value
(44
)
Fair value of contracts as of December 31, 2015
$
6

 
Fair Value of Contracts as of December 31, 2015
 
Maturity
 
 
Fair value hierarchy Gains/(Losses)
1 Year or Less
 
Greater Than 1 Year to 3 Years
 
Greater Than 3 Years to 5 Years
 
Greater Than
5 Years
 
Total Fair
Value
 
(In millions)
Level 1
$
(97
)
 
$
(129
)
 
$
(20
)
 
$

 
$
(246
)
Level 2
317

 
(2
)
 
(16
)
 
(14
)
 
285

Level 3
(26
)
 
(5
)
 
(1
)
 
(1
)
 
(33
)
Total
$
194

 
$
(136
)
 
$
(37
)
 
$
(15
)
 
$
6

The Company has elected to disclose derivative assets and liabilities on a trade-by-trade basis and does not offset amounts at the counterparty master agreement level. Also, collateral received or paid on the Company's derivative assets or liabilities are recorded on a separate line item on the balance sheet. Consequently, the magnitude of the changes in individual current and non-current derivative assets or liabilities is higher than the underlying credit and market risk of the Company's portfolio. As discussed in Item 7A — Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk, Commodity Price Risk, NRG measures the sensitivity of the Company's portfolio to potential changes in market prices using VaR, a statistical model which attempts to predict risk of loss based on market price and volatility. NRG's risk management policy places a limit on one-day holding period VaR, which limits the Company's net open position. As the Company's trade-by-trade derivative accounting results in a gross-up of the Company's derivative assets and liabilities, the net derivative assets and liability position is a better indicator of NRG's hedging activity. As of December 31, 2015, NRG's net derivative asset was $6 million, a decrease to total fair value of $407 million as compared to December 31, 2014. This decrease was primarily driven by the roll-off of trades that settled during the period and losses in fair value.
Based on a sensitivity analysis using simplified assumptions, the impact of a $0.50 per MMBtu increase in natural gas prices across the term of the derivative contracts would result in a decrease of approximately $414 million in the net value of derivatives as of December 31, 2015.
The impact of a $0.50 per MMBtu decrease in natural gas prices across the term of the derivative contracts would result in an increase of approximately $392 million in the net value of derivatives as of December 31, 2015.

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